Ten Dollar Fruit Pie

Author Or Recipe byCommonGround

Verna Wolf of Killdeer, North Dakota, grew up on a farm in western North Dakota near the town of Alexander in McKenzie County, to be exact. Her family's farm was diversified. They ran Hereford cattle and raised wheat and occasionally oats.

It was against this backdrop that she grew up. Chores were ever present. It was Verna's duty to let chickens out of the coop and feed them, gather eggs without breaking them, lock the hens up at night, even when the coyotes howled over the next hill. Skunks loved eggs, so we had to be sure there was no way for them to get into the coop.

It was also on Verna's chore list to go to the pasture and bring the cows home to the barn for milking. She helped milk in evenings and was kicked many times while doing that.

Gardens were a must then. So she often found herself on hands and knees weeding the veggies by hand.

When Verna grew older, she was put on the tractor and was taught to one-way the summer fallow fields. One-way was a machine that worked the soil with big discs and killed the weeds.

Putting up hay was an early summer event. Again, she drove the tractor and raked hay into windrows for later baling. After baling she would then drive the tractor and would pull the wagon through the fields as her Dad loaded bales onto it by hand.

About the same time, she had learned to drive a truck and hauled grain during harvest from combine to bin.

Also, it was always house cleaning on Saturday. She hung clothes on the clothes line up the hill on wash day. This always led to ironing.

Not all was work. Verna rode her bike up every hill on the farm to market road near their family's farm. She also did a lot of hiking in the prairie hills and always had a dog for a companion. There was time to read, also.

Life wasn't so hectic. Visiting neighbors was common and there were card parties, too. We didn't have as many conveniences then, but those that did would have-electricity, gas stoves, propane furnace as opposed to coal- our family was glad to have.

Verna says, "A pretty good way to grow up."

Yields8 Servings
 1 cup Sugar
 1 cup Flour
 1 cup Milk
 3 tsp Baking Powder
 ½ cup Butter
 1 qt Fruit Sweetened to Taste Pie Mix in Cans Will Work
1

Melt butter in the bottom of a 9"x13"x2" pan.

2

Heat fruit to boiling.

3

Make the batter with flour, sugar, baking powder and milk.

4

Pour over the batter over the melted butter in the 9"x13"x2" pan.

5

Pour the hot fruit over batter.

6

DO NOT STIR.

7

Bake at 375 degrees for 25 minutes.

Category

Ingredients

 1 cup Sugar
 1 cup Flour
 1 cup Milk
 3 tsp Baking Powder
 ½ cup Butter
 1 qt Fruit Sweetened to Taste Pie Mix in Cans Will Work

Directions

1

Melt butter in the bottom of a 9"x13"x2" pan.

2

Heat fruit to boiling.

3

Make the batter with flour, sugar, baking powder and milk.

4

Pour over the batter over the melted butter in the 9"x13"x2" pan.

5

Pour the hot fruit over batter.

6

DO NOT STIR.

7

Bake at 375 degrees for 25 minutes.

Ten Dollar Fruit Pie

One Comments

  • Anonymous February 15, 2021

    How wonderful to read Verna Wolf’s story of growing up in rural McKenzie County, ND. I had the pleasure of working and writing with Verna through the Dunn County Writers and the Dunn County Historical Society 2013-2018 and was ever-delighted by her tales of life on the High Plains … I also enjoyed several of her homemade desserts and look forward to making this pie. Thanks for sharing your words and recipes, Verna! Love from Oregon,
    Jennifer Strange (Terry, too)

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